Interview with Lazy Tiger

Tell us about yourself, who are you and where do you come from?

My name is Lazy Tiger, I have lived in New Jersey for most of my life after originally living in Philadelphia. At a very young age, I always had an extreme fascination with music, most kids did but I knew it was excessive when I started listening to tv/film scores. I would intentionally rewatch scenes from movies and television shows just because of their scores playing during those particular scenes. It was more of a shock to me because I was originally an actor, doing tv/film since I was a kid. Sometimes I would get distracted trying to read scripts and learn lines because I was listening to music or watching interviews or documentaries about musicians.

How was your passion for music born? Who are your idols?

My passion for music unexpectedly began when I would simply just hear the music my mother was playing around me when she would drive me to school. She played a lot of the classic electronic hits from the 70s-90s. When I was in high school, I discovered Deadmau5, which led me to artists today that I look up to like Purity Ring, Mr. Carmack, ODESZA, CHVRCHES, Flume, etc. Around the same time I discovered Deadmau5, I really got into film/tv scores, specifically composers like Bear McCreary, Hanz Zimmer, Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, etc. When I was living in Philly and Jersey City, I was very much influenced by hip hop. I listened to A Tribe Called Quest, Souls of Mischief, MF DOOM, Charizma, Tupac, Biggie. Not to mention, I’m very much in love with indie, alternative, and rock genres. It’s safe to say my musical tastes are all over the place.

What kind of music do you do?

I like making electronic music that’s not very specific. Most of it doesn’t contain lyrics, usually vocal chops, that way any listener can relate to a track however they feel. I like blending different styles of the music I listen to into singular ideas or projects. I love cinematic music, so those soundscapes are pretty much a staple in the music I make. I’ll like to add different elements to them, for example, if I want to make a more hip hop style production thats more on the chill side, I’ll maybe add some piano and strings for warm and emotion. I could also have a very energetic electronic idea but with percussion sampled from eastern instruments for a more tribal feel you would get from a film score. Pop music is very big for me too, so I’ll add some sprinkles of it throughout the music I make, especially with the bass. The bass is usually the idea that drives my productions forward.

What is the most important song for you? What message do you want to convey to the listener?

If my music has helped anyone in some way, that means so much to me. I’ve had random messages from people telling me they had a rough day, and one of my songs helped them, even if it was just for a few minutes. I want the listener to connect however they feel they can, that’s why I like to leave some ambiguity in my music, so the listeners’ minds can wander freely.

Why should a listener who doesn’t know you listen to your music?

If they’re looking for new styles of music that they wouldn’t normally hear, I’d hope they would give me a shot. I like making music that sticks with you, that you can freely daydream with, unlock memories you forgot you had, etc. And I make it using sounds from other cultures or instruments you wouldn’t normally hear in certain genres, so I would hope there would be at least one song for everyone.

What are your future projects? Where do you see yourself 5 years from now?

In the near future, I have big plans for Lazy Tiger, both musically and visually. Visuals are actually a big part of my music making process and I plan to have a way of conveying that, hopefully soon. I am working with singers and songwriters, something I’ve been meaning to do for a couple of years now, so I am very excited about what we can come up with. I would also like to be performing with a full band, featuring instruments from all parts of the world. I really want to have those shows be as live as possible, while maintaining that electronic dance energy. I am always working as hard as I can to get better and better at making music, to keep experimenting, to collaborate, and to learn something new whenever I can.

Tell our readers a funny episode that happened in your career as an artist.

Maybe within the first year I started to produce, I released a song on SoundCloud and it got some traction pretty quickly. One day I received a message from someone thanking me for making that song, and that it was the best song they ever had sex to. That’s one of the stories that sticks out to me the most, I’ll probably never forget that one.